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Now a non-trivial percentage of us is convinced that biology teachers should carry guns.

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One way to fend off this very fortunate brand of anxiety is to check out some new cookbooks. Not designing menus for state dinners or assembling cookie platters for holiday parties but devising flavorful, nutritious everyday meals for Barack, Michelle, Malia and Sasha in their private residence, where dinner was a command performance for every member of the family, including the president. Have you heard? They may finally have caught the Golden State Killer, who managed to commit more than 50 rapes and 12 murders between and , until he just … stopped. In the beginning, this night stalker restricted himself to raping single women in their bedrooms and limited his activities to the Sacramento area of Northern California.

Back then, he wore a homemade mask and was known as the East Area Rapist.

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After committing as many as 50 sexual assaults, he worked his way down to Santa Barbara and attacked couples. Not that Lynch need unduly worry about his talents becoming obsolete. Some people say that summer reading — whether poolside or briskly air-conditioned — means big, unwieldy books, too heavy to lug farther than from the shelf to the lounge chair, a single volume to last the season. These people baffle me. The best summer reading is absorbing, delightful and, in the sun or shade, will make you break a sweat.

What Kingsley finds is a fully consensual commune where men serve the women and everyone is very happy with the situation. Reisz writes sadomasochistic scenes that are charged with love and care alongside the sex and suffering, and Kingsley is an engaging hero to follow on this strange fantasy of a mission. But after the death of her husband, she found that her enjoyment of her quiet hours had palled. Some readers sniff that only those with especially eventful lives should have the temerity to publish memoirs.

Soon after I moved to Manhattan in the late s, an old friend taught me to roller-skate. It feels like a lifetime ago now. We would go dancing at clubs — those disco nights — and then, as a new day dawned, lace up our boots and roll into Central Park. We had the place to ourselves, though getting any speed was tricky since the roads were pocked and potted. On all sides, the lawns were filthy and tattered. But as I looped through it, I fell in love with Central Park. Luckily, at about the same time another woman felt the same way. Inspector Drake is called to the scene and quickly discovers a message left by the killer — traffic cones in the shape of a number four.

The killer starts sending the Wales Police Service lyrics from famous rock songs. Are they messages, or is there some hidden meaning in them? Does it all mean more killings are likely? When a politician is killed, Drake has his answer. And then the killer sends more song lyrics. Now Drake has to face the possibility of more deaths, but with numbers dominating the case, Drake has to face his own rituals and obsessions.

Finally, when the killer threatens Drake and his family, he faces his greatest challenge in finding the killer before he strikes again. Brass in Pocket is a traditional detective mystery, and excellent British crime thriller starring Inspector Ian Drake. The audiobook production, sound quality, narration by Richard Elfyn were nothing less than spectacular.

As I write a series involving Inspector Drake I enjoy developing his character and family life alongside the hurdles he faces day to day with the challenging and changing world of fighting crime. Crime fiction also gives me the opportunity to develop current themes faced in society today. I have a background in the law so I draw a lot on my work in the criminal courts and doing divorce work for inspiration.

My home country Wales also gives me great inspiration for the background and setting of the books. I enjoy a wide ranging and varied writers. Philip Marlowe must rank as one of the great fictional creations as the classic hard-boiled detective. The feedback I most enjoyed was from a reader in the outback of Australia who lives in a remote location and loved being able to learn about Wales from reading my books.

Great fun! I enjoyed preparing the spreadsheet of characters with various accents for the narrator and coordinating all the arrangements for the production with the studio. And that should encourage reading, which can only be a good thing. And audio books are a performance in themselves which make them a different sort of experience altogether. Jonathan Quinn is the best at what he does: making bodies disappear. Within the espionage world, his reputation is impeccable. There was a time, though, when that reputation was still being built under his mentor, Durrie. Fifteen years ago, Quinn was offered a job.

On the surface, a straightforward mission to stop a terrorist. But the client gave Quinn the additional task of taking on Durrie as his number two, as a last chance for the veteran agent to be rehabilitated. Durrie had been on a downward spiral, going from being a highly respected operative to an unreliable has-been. Both she and Quinn were desperate to help Durrie return to the person he once was. They hoped this job would be the answer.

His first five years were spent as an apprentice, then, after being on his own, he becomes one of the best body removal specialist in the espionage world. This includes making whatever bodies have been left behind disappear forever. But, over the course of the series twelve novels, several short stories and a novella, so far , he reunites with Orlando, the woman he has secretly loved for years. With her and Nate, they become a team that only gets better and better at what they do.

How did the relationship between Quinn and Orlando originate? Quinn and Orlando started off as apprentices at the same time, for mentors where friends. So, they often worked together. Quinn found himself drawn to her from the very start. But his mentor, Durrie, made the first move, beginning a relationship with Orlando that left Quinn out in the cold. Five years later, after a tragedy that threatened to divide Quinn and Orlando forever, Quinn has little choice but to go to her for help.

From that moment, their relationship begins to mend until it becomes something even more than Quinn could have ever hoped. Orlando, of course, who is both a badass in the field and pretty handy with computers. Daeng, a former Thai monk who is pretty chill even in highly stressful situations. And, most recently, Jar, my current favorite character a young Thai woman who is on the autism spectrum, and is even better at all things cyber than Orlando. There are other operatives who make occasional appearances, but these are the core members of the team. Discuss the development of the series featuring Nate in Night Man.

And from that came Night Man.

Did anything stand out in your writing process during Night Man? A few things. The Night Man books—well, book at the moment—will all be more crime based thrillers as opposed to spy thrillers like Quinn. This have given me a whole new area to dive into, which is exciting. The stories are also told in first person by Nate, which is different than the Quinn books, too. I absolutely love writing in first person.


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Finally, Night Man was a blast to write. This time the story takes place fifteen years ago, when Quinn was still establishing himself as a cleaner—the person who makes bodies disappear—and centers around his deteriorating relationship with his mentor, who may or may not be going mad. A dangerous thing in a world full of guns and secrets and death. You can learn more at his website:.

The dead, a reclusive couple living off the grid, turn out to be mysterious fugitives. Undeterred by mounting political pressure, Koa pursues the truth only to find himself drawn into a web of international intrigue. While Koa investigates, the Big Island scrambles to prepare for the biggest and most explosive political rally in its history.

Three disparate threads came together to inspire Off The Grid. First, my wife and I bought a painting from an artist who lived in a ramshackle house deep in the forest near the nearly off the grid village of Volcano, Hawaii. Second, one night my wife and I drove up to our favorite local restaurant in Hawi, a small town on the northwest coast of the Big Island, only to find it permanently closed because law enforcement authorities had arrested the proprietor as a fugitive from justice.

My subsequent research established that he was far from the only wanted man to have been caught hiding out on the Big Island. Lastly, I am an avid reader of the international press and had become fascinated by one of the most bizarre, unexplained misadventures in contemporary military history. No spoilers here. So voila! I had fugitives from a bizarre international incident living off the grid in rural Hawaii. All I had to do was find a unique way to imagine their deaths and unleash my chief detective on the case. Given my legal background and expertise, I wanted a character who would work with a prosecutor.

Thus, Koa became a police detective. The story is set in Hawaii and draws on Hawaiian history, culture, and language. To effectively relate the culture and language, I wanted Koa to be Hawaiian. Like all good protagonists, he had to have a compelling backstory—one that drove his passion for justice. Regret, fear, guilt are powerful emotions that drive people to both good and bad ends. A cop with a deadly secret in his past provided lots of interesting hooks for a murder mystery.

Thus, Koa became the killer turned cop with a potent passion to extract justice. If you were to describe him, what are some of his characteristics? Koa is smart and tenacious, but driven by remorse and guilt for having killed a man. Having escaped punishment for his crime, he is highly suspicious and paranoid about being conned, the way he deceived the police who investigated his crime. He is Hawaiian to the core, with a deep knowledge and appreciation of Hawaiian history and culture, but also worldly because of his military service.

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A loyal friend, his relationships with people run deep as exemplified by his bond with his giant fisherman buddy Hook Hao. He inspires loyalty in others, particularly Zeke Brown, the Hawaii county prosecutor. Writing a police procedural required much research, but involved much fun. There are many tools available to writers. In my professional life, I had considerable experience with the legal side of criminal procedure, including warrants, searches, interrogations, prosecutors, grand juries, indictments, trials, and incarceration. I have used forensic text books, police equipment catalogues, and interviews with police officers to learn the more nitty-gritty side of police work.

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Although Hilo is a small town, it has a political elite that cherishes and nurtures power. Koa, on the other hand, grew up dirt poor and pulled himself up through tenacious hard work, and is driven by remorse and guilt to find justice for the victims of crime. He has little patience for politics and believes that the rich and famous commit just as many crimes as the poor and downtrodden. What was your experience coming up with the plot for Off the Grid?

I knew from the outset how I wanted to begin Off The Grid and I also knew the general shape of the ending. So it was with Off The Grid. I also wanted to fashion a multi-layered mystery, and so Koa first follows a string of clues to the identity of the initially unidentified victims. As he solves that mystery, he must discover and pursue the killers, yet that too leads to yet another question—who is the mastermind behind it all.

And why? I first went to the Big Island of Hawaii in and fell in love with the mountains and incredibly varied landscapes and climates. When most people think of Hawaii, its beaches and palm trees come to mind, but the Big Island has much more—rain forests, cattle ranches, and alpine climates to name but a few of its charms. Mauna Kea reaches 14, feet above sea level and was once glaciated during the ice ages.

It still collects several feet of snow most winters. The day atop the mountain arise before sunlight touches the rest of the island and the sun set on the land below before it fades from the mountain top. If the weather is right you can stand on the beach, looking up through the palm trees to see the snow-capped peak of Mauna Kea turn red at sunset. I was lucky enough to meet real Hawaiians who shared their knowledge of this most special island. The land, its unique history, the culture of its people, and their language fascinated me.

In many ways, Hawaii itself, the real Hawaii, became one of the most important characters in Off The Grid. What are some interesting facts you discovered in your research? The ancient Hawaiians were great environmentalist. They imposed taboos restricting certain kinds of fishing during certain times of the year. They also created substantial aquaculture projects, raising fish in salt water ponds connected to the ocean. Their dry land farming systems produced surplus crops. Lacking a written language, the ancient Hawaiians became great story tellers, not unlike the great epic poets of Greek and Roman antiquity, capturing their genealogical history in long poems, memorizing navigational information in chants, and explaining natural phenomena through legendary gods and goddesses.

For almost a hundred years thereafter, Hawaiians were forbidden to speak their native language in schools or government. The biggest challenge that I faced, and the biggest challenge for most emerging authors, was finding a publisher. Connecting with Oceanview Publishing has offered a second huge benefit. They have contracted to publish my third book— Fire and Vengeance —in As a lawyer I was always more or less constrained by the provable facts.

Good review are also nice! First, write what you know and love. Second, find a good editor, one who will look at the substance of your story as well as the grammar and spelling. The exchange of ideas with a skillful editor will improve your work a hundred fold. I will share four of my favorites quotes about truth. Robert B. An avid photographer and part-time resident of the Big Island since the s, he and his wife split their time between New York and Hawaii.

Her plan to attend the wedding of her friend, Anna, runs aground when a boatload of trouble washes ashore, and as the old year ticks down, the body count goes up. Thrust into the path of an increasingly desperate killer, Lindsay must uncover a sinister secret before she winds up swimming with the fishes.

Old family scandals, sunken World War II U-boats, obscene desserts, and a stolen Doberman all guarantee a far from restful break for the irreverent reverend, who makes her second appearance in this lively mystery. Author Mindy Quigley can tell a really good story. Between the first book and this one, A Death in Duck, is the stronger story in my opinion.

More cohesive, strong motivations, multiple layers of conflict, subplots, tension, family drama and a good villain. Or, you could sum it all up in a few words—Good storytelling. Great, storytelling actually. How closely did you work with your narrator before and during the recording process? Did you give them any pronunciation tips or special insight into the characters? That accent is a trip! It sounds like an Irish accent and a Southern accent had a baby, and that baby was born with a mouth full of marbles. Are you an audiobook listener?

What about the audiobook format appeals to you? I knew Izzard as a quirky comedian who often performed in drag, so I was extra impressed by his skill as a narrator. For me, a good audiobook is all about the sharpness of the characterizations. If you had the power to time travel, would you use it? If yes, when and where would you go? That question is best answered by punching those dumb-dumbs in the face. Seriously, though, whatever way someone chooses to inject narrative content into their brains is okay by me. Some people have long commutes, and audiobooks provide a great companion.

Some people, like my grandmother, have vision impairments that prevent them from reading. Audiobooks are her lifeline. Personally, I love reading, listening to audiobooks, and watching movies and TV shows. I even like hearing storytellers at events and festivals. A great story is a great story, no matter how it gets from one person to another.

How did you celebrate after finishing this novel? I mean, are you supposed to celebrate when you finish the draft? The corrections?

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Submit it to your agent? Return the page proofs? See it in print? Register your first sale? Get your first review? Mindy Quigley is the author of the Mount Moriah cozy mystery series, which is based in part on her time working with the chaplains at Duke University Medical Center. Her non-writing career has been stranger than fiction, taking her from the US to the UK, where she worked as the personal assistant to the scientist who cloned Dolly the sheep, and as project manager for a research clinic founded by the author J.

She now lives in Blacksburg, Virginia, with her Civil War history professor husband, their children, and their idiosyncratic miniature Schnauzer. An actress and physical theatre performer for many years before becoming a Voice Actor, Holly continues to divide her time between stage, screen, circus, and audiobook narration. Holly began her VO career doing radioplays and audiobook characters with the amazing Full Cast Audio company.

Since then, Holly has voiced radio and web commercials, various e-learning projects, documentary shorts. Holly has conservatory training; her attention to tone, energy and rhythm make her work personal and dynamic. Holly loves telling stories! Like this: Like Loading How competitive are fighter pilots? Does Lions of the Sky employ any themes? Who are your favorite authors? Are you excited about the new Top Gun movie? About the Audiobook Author : Jason D. About the Author: Jason D.